H Company 16th Infantry Big Red One

In Memory of Captain Anthony J Prahl and all the men who served with 
              H Company 16th Infantry, First Infantry Divison In WWII 

Distinguished Service Cross, Description:

Description: A cross of bronze, 2 inches in height and 1 13/16 inches in width with an eagle on the center and a scroll below the eagle bearing the inscription "FOR VALOR". On the reverse side, the center of the cross is circled by a wreath with a space for engraving the name of the recipient.

Ribbon: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches wide and consists of the following stripes: 1/8 inch Old Glory Red 67156; 1/16 inch White 67101; 1 inch Imperial Blue 67175; 1 1/16 inch White; and 1/8 inch Old Glory Red.

CRITERIA: The Distinguished Service Cross is awarded to a person who, while serving in any capacity with the Army, distinguishes himself or herself by extraordinary heroism not justifying the award of a Medal of Honor; while engaged in an action against an enemy of the Unites States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing/foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing Armed Force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The act or acts of heroism must have been so notable and have involved risk of life so extraordinary as to set the individual apart from his or her comrades.

BACKGROUND: a. The Distinguished Service Cross was established by President Woodrow Wilson on January 2, 1918. General Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of the Expeditionary Forces in France, had recommended that recognition other than the Medal of Honor, be authorized for the Armed Forces of the United States for service rendered, in like manner, to that awarded by the European Armies. The request for establishment of the medal was forwarded from the Secretary of War to the President in a letter dated December 28, 1917. The Act of Congress establishing this award (193-65th Congress) dated July 9, 1918 is contained in Title 10 United States Code (USC) 3742. The establishment of the Distinguished Service Cross was promulgated in War Department General Order No. 6, dated January 12, 1918.

Description taken from wikipedia.

All Citations and Synopsis taken from http://www.homeofheroes.com

Pfc. John W Adams DSC (posthumously)

ADAMS, JOHN W. (KIA)

Synopsis:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John W. Adams,

Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force.Private First Class Adams distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 18 November 1944 while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division.His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division,and the United States Army.


Cprl Peter Cavaliere DSC D-Day

CAVALIERE, PETER

Citation:The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished

Service Cross to Peter Cavaliere (31070940), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 6 June 1944, in France.

    As Private Cavaliere's company was about to attack the town of Colleville sur Mer, the enemy laid down an intense artillery barrage and started a counter attack. This required that the attack be launched from a different sector. As his company was moving out, Private Cavaliere voluntarily remained behind to cover its movement. He took cover in a building from which he could snipe at the enemy. Though subjected in this position to heavy artillery fire, Private Cavaliere resisted every effort to dislodge him and maintained his accurate fire against the enemy, effectively hampering their attempt to cut off his company. The gallantry, tenacity of purpose and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Private Cavaliere exemplifies the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division,and the United States Army.

Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 31 (July 1, 1944)

Born: at Bristol, Rhode Island

Home Town: Bristol, Rhode Island

 Photo taken by My Grandfather after the end of hostilities.

Staff Sergeant Robert D. Farmer 

Robert D. Farmer
Date of death: Killed in Action  18-Nov-44
Home of record: Blue Earth County, Minnesota
Status: KIA

AWARDS AND CITATIONS
Distinguished Service Cross

Awarded posthumously for actions during the World War II

(Citation Needed) - SYNOPSIS: Staff Sergeant Robert D. Farmer (ASN: 37279649), United States Army, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with the 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 18 November 1944. Staff Sergeant Farmer's intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

General Orders: Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 53 (1945)
Action Date: 18-Nov-44
Service: Army
Rank: Staff Sergeant
Regiment: 16th Infantry Regiment
Division: 1st Infantry Division

SSgt. Robert D Hopes DSC posthumously  

HOPES, ROBERT D. (KIA) Synopsis:The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert D. Hopes (13012657), Staff Sergeant, U.S.Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment,1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 17 October 1944.    


    Staff Sergeant Hopes' intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 53 (1945)Home Town: Washington County, Pennsylvania



                             Sgt. Alfred B. Nietzel DSC 
                                     (posthumously)                            
                                 Upgraded to the MOH

*NIETZEL, ALFRED B. (KIA)


Synopsis:


The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished


Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alfred B. Nietzel (12018923), Sergeant, U.S. Army,for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 18 November 1944.


    Sergeant Nietzel's intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty at the cost of his life, exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.


Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 53 (1945)


Home Town: Queens, New York

Pfc. Joseph P Parke DSC D-Day

PARKE, JOSEPH P.


Synopsis: The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph P. Parke, Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 6 June 1944, in France. Private Parke's intrepid actions,personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1stInfantry Division, and the United States Army.


           Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 7 (1946)


THE BIG RED ONE IN BRIDPORT


Joseph Parke, who was born in Ireland in 1922, went with his family, to live in America when he was five years old. He joined the army in New York as soon as he could and by the time he reached Bridport he was Private First Class Joseph P.Parke Service # 12022214 in the 16th Infantry of the First United States Army, now often referred toas The Big Red One.


    He was stationed in Bridport and was billeted in the building in North Street, which is now the Conservative club. Coincidentally his brother Jim Parke was billeted at Abbotsbury. The 16th Infantry were in Dorset while preparing for the Normandy invasion and Joseph was lucky enough to meet an Irish girl called Mary Conlon whose family had come to Bridport to work at Pymore Mill.


    It is also the story of a young man of extreme bravery who went over the Channel to fight the Germans on D-Day and survived. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for staying behind to defuse the situation while the rest of Company 'H' moved out to start an attack from another direction. In the four hours that he was on his own he disorganized the enemy with a continuous and accurate hail of fire while over three hundred artillery shells were fired towards his position.


    After the War Joseph Parke joined the American Air Force and came back to Britain,this time with his wife Mary and their first child, Jo, was born at Pymore.


(information taken from a now defunkt website)

SHELBY, JOHN D.



(First Award)


Citation: The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John D. Shelby (0-885777), First Lieutenant (Infantry), [then Second Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion,16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 11July 1943, in Sicily.


     In the course of a savage counterattack by some thirty enemy tanks and infantry to drive through, First Lieutenant Shelby with complete disregard for his personal safety moved to an observation post in advance of his battalion. Though subjected to intense artillery and small arms fire in his vulnerable position, he laid the fire of his mortar platoon on the enemy infantry with such devastating effect that their attack was disorganized. Though subjected to fierce tank fire, he continued to call for his own fire until the shells from his own guns were falling within one hundred and fifty yards of his position. He remained at this forward post until it was physically overrun by the enemy armor. Escaping injury, he returned to his own unit and continued the fight until the enemy withdrew with heavy losses.


 First Lieutenant Shelby's inspiring leadership, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.


Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 16 (May 3, 1944)


SHELBY, JOHN D.


(Second Award)


Citation:


The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to John D. Shelby (0-885777), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 6 June 1944, in France.


     First Lieutenant Shelby landed with the initial assault waves on the coast of France. He immediately organized five men into an assault team and, completely disregarding his own safety, led them in a 200-yard dash through devastating enemy fire and across a mine field to attack an antitank gun. He alone assaulted the gun position and engaged the enemy crew in a hand-to-hand battle, killing one man and taking six prisoners. Leaving the defense of the gun and position to his men, he then took command of a group of troops who were advancing leaderless up the hill and personally led them, despite heavy sniper fire, in an attack upon a nearby town.


 The personal bravery, initiative and courageous leadership displayed by First Lieutenant Shelby exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.


Headquarters, First U.S. Army, General Orders No. 45 (August 9, 1944)


Home Town: Slaton, Texas


Personal Awards: 2 Distinguished Service Crosses (WWII)

 


Photo edited from a postcard Gift Given to my Grandfather by Jack "Jackson" Shaughnessy from H Co. 16th Killed in Action D-Day 6th June 1944, he was the only officer killed on 6th June from H Company.